Ben Ramsey

Setting Up Jenkins on Amazon Linux for PHP Testing

"Coding Shots Annual Plan high res-5" by Matthew (WMF) - Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

One of my first tasks at ShootProof was to set up a Jenkins server for continuous integration and get it ready to run unit tests for PHP and JavaScript code. There are plenty of tutorials around the web to help you do just that. This is yet another one, but it’s primarily my cleaned-up notes—and less of a tutorial—placed here for my future self to find and provided publicly for all to benefit.

My First Month at ShootProof

It’s difficult to write a blog post about a new gig without coming across as sounding critical of past employers. That’s not my intent, but this first month I’ve spent at ShootProof has been one of the best months I’ve had in a long time, career-wise.

My first day at ShootProof was July 1st, and as I’ve come to my one-month anniversary with the company, I wanted to share some of the reasons that attracted me to ShootProof and why I’m still excited about it, after a month of working here.

All Good Things…

"New Beginnings" by Tim Ebbs

Over the past month or so, I have wrestled with one of the hardest decisions I’ve faced in my career. I’ve spent just over one-fourth of my professional career with Moontoast—4.5 years. This is a long time in Internet years. During my time here, I’ve learned a lot about startups, building Internet products, running in the cloud, and much more. There are great things happening at Moontoast—changes that make it a stronger, more effective company with an awesome product. It’s an exciting time to be a part of the company! For me, it’s been an excellent ride, but it’s time to move on.

Will Encryption Catch on With Keybase?

"Day 161 - Keys" by Iain Watson

Email is not secure. Let’s stop fooling ourselves. Just because I use Gmail, and I’m using it over HTTPS does not mean that the email I send or receive is encrypted while being transmitted outside of Google’s network. Inside Google’s network, even, the contents are not encrypted.1 So, why do we keep sending sensitive information through email, and why do our banks and mortgage brokers and HR departments keep asking for us to send our Social Security number, bank accounts, and other private details through email?

Is it because we are oblivious, naïve, or do we just not care? I suspect it’s a little of all three, but mainly it’s because encryption is hard, and the difficulty barrier keeps us from adopting it.

The alpha launch of Keybase has got me excited. It uses the public-key cryptography (a.k.a. PGP/GnuPG) model to identify yourself, prove your identity, and allow others to vouch for your identity. I hope it paves the way to making encryption easier for us all, from the technologically-skilled to the technologically-challenged.

Dates Are Hard

"Astronomical Clock Detail" by Tim Bocek

No, I’m not talking about a meeting with a lover or potential lover. While those can be stressful, the calendar math used to determine the precise date and time on which such a meeting might occur is infinitely more difficult to perform. To software programmers, this isn’t news, but I recently encountered an issue when calculating the time for an RFC 4122 UUID that had me questioning the accuracy of our modern, accepted calendars, especially with regard to the days of the week on which our dates fall.